EU Air Passenger Rights

The EU law concerning air passenger rights is officially known as Regulation (EC) No 261/2004 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 11 February 2004. That’s quite a mouthful, so we just call it EC 261. It is a European law that requires airlines to compensate passengers for lengthy flight delays, cancellations, and in situations where they are denied boarding.

Passenger Rights for EU Delayed Flights

Passengers on EU flights that are eligible under EC 261 must be paid up to €600 in compensation for flight delays of more than 3 hours. There are a lot of factors that determine eligibility and how much money you’re owed, but the following sections should answer any questions you might have⎯and then some.

Of course, most routes within Europe are covered. This includes not only EU airspace, but also Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and the so-called “outermost regions” (French Guiana and Martinique, Mayotte, Guadeloupe and La Réunion, Saint-Martin, Madeira and the Azores, and the Canary Islands).

Many international flights are covered, as well. If your flight departs from an airport in the EU, it’s covered. If your flight departs from elsewhere but your destination is in the EU, coverage depends on the airline⎯if it’s a European carrier, you’re covered. Confused yet? Here’s a simple chart to help:

ItineraryEU air carrierNon-EU air carrier
From inside the EU to inside the EUcheck Coveredcheck Covered
From inside the EU to outside the EUcheck Coveredcheck Covered
From outside the EU to inside the EUcheck Covered Not Covered
From outside the EU to outside the EU Not Covered Not Covered

In some cases, disrupted flights outside the EU may be eligible under EC 261 if they connect to a covered flight that is with the same carrier and part of the same flight reservation (under one booking reference number). The easiest way to find out if you’re covered is to use the AirHelp eligibility check.

Only delays longer than 3 hours are covered.The arrival time is not when the wheels touch down on the runway, but when the plane is parked at the gate and the door is opened.

Extraordinary circumstances are not covered.The airline can also avoid liability if the delay was due to what is known as “extraordinary circumstances.” These include situations like lightning strikes, medical emergencies, labor strikes, serious adverse weather conditions, Air Traffic Control restrictions, sudden malfunctioning of the airport radar, acts of sabotage, political unrest, acts of terrorism… you get the idea.

Not-so-extraordinary circumstances should be covered.Airlines often cite “technical difficulties” or “operational circumstances” as reasons for delays. The good news is that the European Court of Justice (ECJ) has repeatedly stated that those don’t qualify as “extraordinary circumstances,” which means they are not sufficient to relieve the airline of its obligations under EC 261.

Provided your flight is eligible, the compensation amount is dependent on three factors:

  • Travel distance
  • Whether your flight is within the EU or not
  • Length of delay⎯as we said before, only delays greater than 3 hours are covered.

It’s a little complicated but, once again, we’ve made a chart that explains it:

Length of delay 
Less than 3 hours3 – 4 hoursMore than 4 hoursNever arrivedDistance
€ –€250€250€250All flights 1,500 km or less
€ –€400€400€400Internal EU flights over 1,500 km
€ –€400€400€400Non-internal EU flights between 1,500 km and 3,500 km
€ –€300€600€600Non-internal EU flights over 3,500 km

As we mentioned, travel distance is a factor when determining how much money you are eligible for (see “How much am I entitled to for my delay?” above). But if you have a multi-flight trip, it’s possible that only a portion of it will be factored into your compensation. To determine this, your journey must meet a few conditions first:

  • All flights must be under one booking, not purchased individually.
  • Your flight disruption must be eligible under EC 261 (see “What flights are covered by EC 261?” above).
  • The delay at your final destination must be greater than 3 hours.

When a flight disruption happens that meets the criteria above, the carrier operating that flight is responsible for compensating you. To figure out the eligible distance, the disrupted flight and any legs that come after it are factored in. Any legs of the journey that came before the disruption might be included as well, if they were operated by the same carrier responsible for the delay and there were no intervening flights operated by a different carrier.

To sum up, if one airline causes an issue, they are usually responsible for all of their own flights, even if they came before the disruption, as well as any later flights that are affected, even if they are with a different airline.Let’s look at an example. Say you’re traveling from Los Angeles to Warsaw on three flights, as follows:

LAX destination arrow JFK destination arrow LDN destination arrow WAW

Let’s also imagine that the first flight is with a US carrier, like Delta, and the last two legs are with British Airways, an EU carrier. If the flight from London to Warsaw is delayed by more than 3 hours, then the last two legs of the trip are normally factored into the eligible distance. That’s from New York to Warsaw. The disruption occurred on a flight that was covered under EC 261 and, since British Airways also operated the flight from New York to London, it’s usually included⎯even though it was prior to the disruption.

If the flight from Los Angeles to New York had caused the delay, however, the flight would not be covered under EC261 (see “What flights are covered by EC 261?” above).

Although this rule generally holds true, some EU courts interpret the regulation differently and may not include prior connecting flights in the eligible distance. The best way to check the eligibility of your flight is to use the AirHelp eligibility check.

If you are going to file a compensation claim under EC 261, you can expect some pushback from the airline—even when the law is on your side, they might not be enthusiastic about paying you. To give your claim the best chance of succeeding, here are a few tips to follow:

  • Hold onto any documents related to the disrupted flight and any alternative flights offered, such as e-tickets and boarding passes.
  • Ask the ground crew for information about what is causing the issue.
  • Keep a few notes about the disruption, including the actual arrival time at your final destination. Any information you can collect⎯like photos of the departures board at the airport or any communications from the airline confirming the disruption⎯will be useful for your claim.

Your right to compensation under EC 261 does eventually expire, so it’s important to know the Statute of Limitations for your claim. This varies from one country to the next and is determined by where the headquarters of the airline is or what court has jurisdiction in cases concerning the airline. As always, we have a handy chart for you:

LIMITATION PERIODS IN EUROPE
COUNTRYLIMITATION PERIOD
Austria3 years
Belgium1 year
Bulgaria5 years
Croatia3 years
Cyprus6 years
Czech Republic*3 years
Denmark3 years
Estonia3 years
Finland3 years
France5 years
Germany**3 years
Greece5 years
Hungary5 years
Iceland2 years
Ireland6 years
Italy26 months
Latvia10 years
Lithuania3 years
Luxembourg10 years
MaltaNo limit
Netherlands2 years
Norway3 years
Poland1 year
Portugal3 years
Romania3 years
Slovakia2 years
Slovenia2 years
Spain5 years
Sweden***3 years
Switzerland2 years
United Kingdom6 years

* For the Czech Republic, if the flight occurred in 2013 or before, the limitation period is 2 years. From 2014 on, the limitation period is 3 years.

** For Germany, the limitation period expires the last day of the third year (for example, the limitation period for a flight on 25/2/2016 expires on 31/12/2019).

*** For Sweden, the limitation period is renewed any time a claim is made. So the limitation period for any subsequent claims would be three years from the time the last claim was filed.

We’re glad you asked! We’ve included a few highlights below that haven’t been covered in detail yet.

Right to reimbursement or re-routingIn addition to compensation for your loss of time, if your delay exceeds five hours, you are entitled to a full or partial refund of your original ticket and a return flight to your point of departure, if needed.

Right to careWhen a flight disruption occurs and you’re stuck waiting for the airline to get you back on track toward your destination, you’re entitled to a number of free perks, depending on your flight details. The carrier must provide you with meals and refreshments during the delay as well as access to communications, including two telephone calls, telex or fax messages, and emails. If overnight accommodations are necessary, they must provide you with a hotel room and transportation to and from the airport. The following chart explains eligibility for these rights:

Flight detailsLength of delay
All flights 1,500 km or less2 hours or more
Internal EU flights over 1,500 km3 hours or more
Non-internal EU flights between 1,500 km and 3,500 km3 hours or more
Non-internal EU flights over 3,500 km4 hours or more

Upgrading and downgradingIf you are offered an alternative flight and placed in a higher class than the one you booked, the air carrier cannot charge you any additional payment. On the other hand, if the class of the alternative flight is lower, you can get a reimbursement between 30% and 75% of the price you originally paid.

Further compensationYour right to compensation under EC 261 does not affect your right to request further compensation. This rule does not apply in cases where passengers have voluntarily surrendered their reservations. Of course, the amount you are entitled to under EC 261 may be deducted from whatever additional compensation you receive.

Obligation to inform passengers of their rightsYour first basic right is to be informed about the content of EC 261. Every airline has to display information on passengers’ rights at their check-in counters in every airport where they operate. If our breakdown of the legalese is still not enough, you can read the actual text of EC 261, as well.

Passenger Rights for EU Flight Cancellations

If your flight gets cancelled and the airline didn’t give you at least 14 days’ notice, they may be required to compensate you, according to EC 261. EU passengers are entitled to as much as €600 for cancelled flights, but there are a number of factors that determine both eligibility and compensation amount. The following sections have all the details.

Of course, most routes within Europe are covered. This includes not only EU airspace, but also Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and the so-called “outermost regions” (French Guiana and Martinique, Mayotte, Guadeloupe and La Réunion, Saint-Martin, Madeira and the Azores, and the Canary Islands).

Many international flights are covered, as well. If your flight was scheduled to depart from an airport in the EU, it’s covered. If your flight was scheduled to depart from elsewhere but your destination was in the EU, coverage depends on the airline⎯if it’s a European carrier, you’re covered. Confused yet? Here’s a simple chart to help:

ItineraryEU air carrierNon-EU air carrier
From inside the EU to inside the EUcheck Coveredcheck Covered
From inside the EU to outside the EUcheck Coveredcheck Covered
From outside the EU to inside the EUcheck Coveredcheck Not Covered
From outside the EU to outside the EUcheck Not Coveredcheck Not Covered

In some cases, disrupted flights outside the EU may be eligible under EC 261 if they connect to a covered flight that is with the same carrier and part of the same flight reservation (under one booking reference number). The easiest way to find out if you’re covered is to use the AirHelp eligibility check.

Cancellations with 14 days’ advance notice are not covered.

Compensation claims are not eligible if the airline notifies you at least 14 days in advance. Even if they give you less than 14 days’ notice, they can still avoid having to pay you if they provide re-routing on an alternate flight that meets certain criteria, as follows:

Advance noticeRe-routing requirements
14 daysNone
7 – 13 daysAlternate flight departing no more than 2 hours before and arriving less than 4 hours after the original flight
Less than 7 daysAlternate flight departing no more than 1 hours before and arriving less than 2 hours after the original flight

Extraordinary circumstances are not covered.

The airline can also avoid liability if the cancellation was due to what is known as “extraordinary circumstances.” These include situations like lightning strikes, medical emergencies, labor strikes, serious adverse weather conditions, Air Traffic Control restrictions, sudden malfunctioning of the airport radar, acts of sabotage, political unrest, acts of terrorism, etc.

Not-so-extraordinary circumstances should be covered.

Airlines often cite “technical difficulties” or “operational circumstances” as reasons for cancellations. The good news is that the European Court of Justice (ECJ) has repeatedly stated that those don’t qualify as “extraordinary circumstances,” which means they are not sufficient to relieve the airline of its obligations under EC 261.

Rescheduled flights may be covered.

If, instead of cancelling a flight, the airline reschedules it for a different time of day, then the cancellation rules apply as well, depending on the amount of notice given and the difference in schedule compared to the original itinerary. The rescheduled flight, in this case, is simply considered an alternate flight.

Provided your flight is eligible, the compensation amount is dependent on three factors:

  • Travel distance
  • Whether your flight is within the EU or not
  • Length of delay, if you accept re-routing on another flight

It’s a little complicated but, once again, we’ve made a chart that explains it:

Length of delay (alternate flight vs. original flight) 
Less than 2 hours2 – 3 hours3 – 4 hoursMore than 4 hoursNever arrivedDistance
€125€250€250€250€250All flights 1,500 km or less
€200€200€400€400€400Internal EU flights over 1,500 km
€200€200€400€400€400Non-internal EU flights between 1,500 km and 3,500 km
€300€300€300€600€600Non-internal EU flights over 3,500 km

Your compensation amount may be halved, depending on the overall amount of time you would be delayed in arriving at your final destination on an alternate flight (compared to your originally booked flight). This is reflected in the chart above, with the halved amounts highlighted.

If you decline re-routing on an alternate flight, you are entitled to the compensation amount shown above (with the amount determined by the arrival time of the alternate flight that was offered) as well as a refund of your ticket price and a return flight to your original departure location, if necessary.

As we mentioned, travel distance is a factor when determining how much money you are eligible for (see “How much am I entitled to for my cancellation?” above). But if you have a multi-flight trip, it’s possible that only a portion of it will be factored into your compensation. To determine this, your journey must meet a couple of conditions first:

  • All flights must be under one booking, not purchased individually.
  • Your flight disruption must be eligible under EC261 (see “What flights are covered by EC 261?” above).

When a flight cancellation happens that meets the criteria above, the carrier operating that flight is responsible for compensating you. To figure out the eligible distance, the disrupted flight and any legs that come after it are factored in. Any legs of the journey that came before the disruption might be included as well, if they were operated by the same carrier responsible for the cancellation and there were no intervening flights operated by a different carrier.

To sum up, if one airline causes an issue, they are usually responsible for all of their own flights, even if they came before the disruption, as well as any later flights that are affected, even if they are with a different airline.Let’s look at an example. Say you’re traveling from Los Angeles to Warsaw on three flights, as follows:

LAX destination arrow WAW destination arrow LDN destination arrow WAW

Let’s also imagine that the first flight is with a US carrier, like Delta, and the last two legs are with British Airways, an EU carrier. If the flight from London to Warsaw is cancelled, then the last two legs of the trip are normally factored into the eligible distance. That’s from New York to Warsaw. The disruption occurred on a flight that was covered under EC 261 and, since British Airways also operated the flight from New York to London, it’s usually included⎯even though it was prior to the disruption.

If the flight from Los Angeles to New York was cancelled, however, the flight would not be covered under EC261 (see “What flights are covered by EC 261?” above).

Although this rule generally holds true, some EU courts interpret the regulation differently and may not include prior connecting flights in the eligible distance. The best way to check the eligibility of your flight is to use the AirHelp eligibility check.

If you are going to file a compensation claim under EC 261, you can expect some pushback from the airline—even when the law is on your side, they might not be enthusiastic about paying you. To give your claim the best chance of succeeding, here are a few tips to follow:

  • Hold onto any documents related to the disrupted flight and any alternative flights offered, such as e-tickets and boarding passes.
  • Ask the ground crew for information about what is causing the issue.
  • Keep a few notes about the disruption, including the actual arrival time at your final destination. Any information you can collect⎯like photos of the departures board at the airport or any communications from the airline confirming the disruption⎯will be useful for your claim.

Your right to compensation under EC 261 does eventually expire, so it’s important to know the Statute of Limitations for your claim. This varies from one country to the next and is determined by where the headquarters of the airline is or what court has jurisdiction in cases concerning the airline. As always, we have a handy chart for you:

LIMITATION PERIODS IN EUROPE
COUNTRYLIMITATION PERIOD
Austria3 years
Belgium1 year
Bulgaria5 years
Croatia3 years
Cyprus6 years
Czech Republic*3 years
Denmark3 years
Estonia3 years
Finland3 years
France5 years
Germany**3 years
Greece5 years
Hungary5 years
Iceland2 years
Ireland6 years
Italy26 months
Latvia10 years
Lithuania10 years
Luxembourg10 years
MaltaNo limit
Netherlands2 years
Norway3 years
Poland1 year
Portugal3 years
Romania3 years
Slovakia2 years
Slovenia2 years
Spain5 years
Sweden***3 years
Switzerland2 years
United Kingdom6 years

* For the Czech Republic, if the flight occurred in 2013 or before, the limitation period is 2 years. From 2014 on, the limitation period is 3 years.
** For Germany, the limitation period expires the last day of the third year (for example, the limitation period for a flight on 25/2/2016 expires on 31/12/2019).
*** For Sweden, the limitation period is renewed any time a claim is made. So the limitation period for any subsequent claims would be three years from the time the last claim was filed.

We’re glad you asked! We’ve included a few highlights below that haven’t been covered in detail yet.

Right to reimbursement or re-routing

In addition to compensation for your loss of time, you are entitled to either:

  • a full or partial refund of your original ticket and a return flight to your point of departure, if needed.
  • the earliest possible alternative transport to your final destination.
  • a new ticket to your final destination at a later date of your preference, subject to seat availability.

Any transport between airports has to be arranged at the expense of the air carrier.

Right to care

When a flight disruption occurs and you’re stuck waiting for the airline to get you back on track toward your destination, you’re entitled to a number of free perks, depending on your flight details. The carrier must provide you with meals and refreshments during the delay as well as access to communications, including two telephone calls, telex or fax messages, and emails. If overnight accommodations are necessary, they must provide you with a hotel room and transportation to and from the airport.

Upgrading and downgrading

If you are offered an alternative flight and placed in a higher class than the one you booked, the air carrier cannot charge you any additional payment. On the other hand, if the class of the alternative flight is lower, you can get a reimbursement between 30% and 75% of the price you originally paid.

Further compensation

Your right to compensation under EC 261 does not affect your right to request further compensation. This rule does not apply in cases where passengers have voluntarily surrendered their reservations. Of course, the amount you are entitled to under EC 261 may be deducted from whatever additional compensation you receive.

Obligation to inform passengers of their rights

Your first basic right is to be informed about the content of EC 261. Every airline has to display information on passengers’ rights at their check-in counters in every airport where they operate.

 

If that’s still not enough EU air passenger law, you can also read the actual text of EC 261.

Passenger Rights for EU Denied Boarding

There are some situations where the airline might not allow you on the plane⎯like when you’re bumped from an overbooked flight. EC 261 can compensate passengers up to €600 if they are denied boarding on EU flights. The following sections go over the factors that determine eligibility and how much you’re entitled to.

Of course, most routes within Europe are covered. This includes not only EU airspace, but also Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and the so-called “outermost regions” (French Guiana and Martinique, Mayotte, Guadeloupe and La Réunion, Saint-Martin, Madeira and the Azores, and the Canary Islands).

Many international flights are covered, as well. If your flight was scheduled to depart from an airport in the EU, it’s covered. If your flight was scheduled to depart from elsewhere but your destination was in the EU, coverage depends on the airline⎯if it’s a European carrier, you’re covered. Confused yet? Here’s a simple chart to help:

ItineraryEU air carrierNon-EU air carrier
From inside the EU to inside the EUcheck Coveredcheck Covered
From inside the EU to outside the EUcheck Coveredcheck Covered
From outside the EU to inside the EUcheck Coveredcheck Not Covered
From outside the EU to outside the EUcheck Not Coveredcheck Not Covered

In some cases, disrupted flights outside the EU may be eligible under EC 261 if they connect to a covered flight that is with the same carrier and part of the same flight reservation (under one booking reference number). The easiest way to find out if you’re covered is to use the AirHelp eligibility check.

Only involuntary boarding denials are covered.If you volunteer to surrender your seat in exchange for a refund, an alternate flight, or other benefits, you also surrender your right to compensation under EC 261. Likewise, if you compromise your own ability to board the flight, you lose your right to compensation. Some examples of this would be:

  • Showing up too late to board
  • Not having the proper documentation (such as a boarding pass)
  • Creating a security, health, or safety concern

Provided your flight is eligible, the compensation amount is dependent on two factors:

  • Travel distance
  • Whether your flight is within the EU or not

We love charts, so here’s one that explains how much you’re eligible for based on your flight details:

Distance 
All flights less than 1,500 km€250
Flights within the EU over 1,500 km€400
Non-internal EU flights between 1,500 and 3,500 km€400
Non-internal EU flights greater than 3,500 km€600

Fun fact! Your compensation is due immediately once you are denied boarding. And we mean right there, at the airport. That is in addition to being entitled to re-routing on an alternate flight to your destination.

As we mentioned, travel distance is a factor when determining how much money you are eligible for (see “How much am I entitled to for my boarding denial?” above). But if you have a multi-flight trip, it’s possible that only a portion of it will be factored into your compensation. To determine this, your journey must meet a couple of conditions first:

  • All flights must be under one booking, not purchased individually.
  • Your flight disruption must be eligible under EC261 (see “What flights are covered by EC 261?” above).

When a flight disruption⎯such as being denied boarding⎯meets the criteria above, the carrier operating that flight is responsible for compensating you. To figure out the eligible distance, the disrupted flight and any legs that come after it are factored in. Any legs of the journey that came before the disruption might be included as well, if they were operated by the same carrier responsible for the boarding denial and there were no intervening flights operated by a different carrier.

To sum up, if one airline causes an issue, they are usually responsible for all of their own flights, even if they came before the disruption, as well as any later flights that are affected, even if they are with a different airline.

Let’s look at an example. Say you’re traveling from Los Angeles to Warsaw on three flights, as follows:

LAX destination arrow JFK destination arrow LHR destination arrow WAW

Let’s also imagine that the first flight is with a US carrier, like Delta, and the last two legs are with British Airways, an EU carrier. If you’re denied boarding for the flight from London to Warsaw, then the last two legs of the trip are normally factored into the eligible distance. That’s from New York to Warsaw. The disruption occurred on a flight that was covered under EC 261 and, since British Airways also operated the flight from New York to London, it’s usually included⎯even though it was prior to the disruption.

If you were denied boarding for the flight from Los Angeles to New York, however, the flight would not be covered under EC261 (see “What flights are covered by EC 261?” above).

Although this rule generally holds true, some EU courts interpret the regulation differently and may not include prior connecting flights in the eligible distance. The best way to check the eligibility of your flight is to use the AirHelp eligibility check.

Like we said earlier, your compensation for being denied boarding is due immediately, so you ideally wouldn’t have to go through the claim process (see “How much am I entitled to for my boarding denial?” above). However, if you didn’t get paid at the airport, not to worry⎯you can still file an EC 261 claim after the fact.

You can expect some pushback from the airline—even when the law is on your side, they might not be enthusiastic about paying you. To give your claim the best chance of succeeding, here are a few tips to follow:

  • Hold onto any documents related to the disrupted flight and any alternative flights offered, such as e-tickets and boarding passes.
  • Ask the ground crew for information about what is causing the issue.
  • Keep a few notes about the disruption, including the actual arrival time at your final destination. Any information you can collect⎯like photos of the departures board at the airport or any communications from the airline confirming the disruption⎯will be useful for your claim.

Your right to compensation under EC 261 does eventually expire, so it’s important to know the Statute of Limitations for your claim. This varies from one country to the next and is determined by where the headquarters of the airline is or what court has jurisdiction in cases concerning the airline. As always, we have a handy chart for you:

LIMITATION PERIODS IN EUROPE
COUNTRYLIMITATION PERIOD
Austria3 years
Belgium1 year
Bulgaria5 years
Croatia3 years
Cyprus6 years
Czech Republic*3 years
Denmark3 years
Estonia3 years
Finland3 years
France5 years
Germany**3 years
Greece5 years
Hungary5 years
Iceland2 years
Ireland6 years
Italy26 months
Latvia10 years
Lithuania10 years
Luxembourg10 years
MaltaNo limit
Netherlands2 years
Norway3 years
Poland1 year
Portugal3 years
Romania3 years
Slovakia2 years
Slovenia2 years
Spain5 years
Sweden***3 years
Switzerland2 years
United Kingdom6 years

* For the Czech Republic, if the flight occurred in 2013 or before, the limitation period is 2 years. From 2014 on, the limitation period is 3 years.** For Germany, the limitation period expires the last day of the third year (for example, the limitation period for a flight on 25/2/2016 expires on 31/12/2019).*** For Sweden, the limitation period is renewed any time a claim is made. So the limitation period for any subsequent claims would be three years from the time the last claim was filed.

We’re glad you asked! We’ve included a few highlights below that haven’t been covered in detail yet.

Right to reimbursement or re-routing

In addition to compensation for your loss of time, you are entitled to either:

  1. a full or partial refund of your original ticket and a return flight to your point of departure, if needed or
  2. the earliest possible alternative transport to your final destination or
  3. a new ticket to your final destination at a later date of your preference, subject to seat availability.

Any transport between airports has to be arranged at the expense of the air carrier.

Right to care

When a flight disruption occurs and you’re stuck waiting for the airline to get you back on track toward your destination, you’re entitled to a number of free perks, depending on your flight details. The carrier must provide you with meals and refreshments during the delay as well as access to communications, including two telephone calls, telex or fax messages, and emails. If overnight accommodations are necessary, they must provide you with a hotel room and transportation to and from the airport.

Upgrading and downgrading

If you are offered an alternative flight and placed in a higher class than the one you booked, the air carrier cannot charge you any additional payment. On the other hand, if the class of the alternative flight is lower, you can get a reimbursement between 30% and 75% of the price you originally paid.

Further compensation

Your right to compensation under EC 261 does not affect your right to request further compensation. This rule does not apply in cases where passengers have voluntarily surrendered their reservations. Of course, the amount you are entitled to under EC 261 may be deducted from whatever additional compensation you receive.

Obligation to inform passengers of their rights

Your first basic right is to be informed about the content of EC 261. Every airline has to display information on passengers’ rights at their check-in counters in every airport where they operate. For all of the legal mumbo-jumbo, straight from the source, you can also read the actual text of EC 261.

See if your flight is eligible.

Had a flight delay or other air travel problem in the last three years? Just give us your flight details and we’ll let you know if you’re owed money.

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